Genetic Epidemiology, Translational Neurogenomics, Psychiatric Genetics and Statistical Genetics Laboratories investigate the pattern of disease in families, particularly identical and non-identical twins, to assess the relative importance of genes and environment in a variety of important health problems.
QIMR Home Page
GenEpi Home Page
Publications
Contacts
Research
Staff Index
Collaborators
Software Tools
Computing Resources
Studies
Search
GenEpi Intranet
PMID
32461290
TITLE
Cohort profile: the Australian genetics of depression study.
ABSTRACT
PURPOSE NlmCategory: OBJECTIVE
Depression is the most common psychiatric disorder and the largest contributor to global disability. The Australian Genetics of Depression study was established to recruit a large cohort of individuals who have been diagnosed with depression at some point in their lifetime. The purpose of establishing this cohort is to investigate genetic and environmental risk factors for depression and response to commonly prescribed antidepressants.
PARTICIPANTS NlmCategory: METHODS
Depression is the most common psychiatric disorder and the largest contributor to global disability. The Australian Genetics of Depression study was established to recruit a large cohort of individuals who have been diagnosed with depression at some point in their lifetime. The purpose of establishing this cohort is to investigate genetic and environmental risk factors for depression and response to commonly prescribed antidepressants. A total of 20 689 participants were recruited through the Australian Department of Human Services and a media campaign, 75% of whom were female. The average age of participants was 43 years±15 years. Participants completed an online questionnaire that consisted of a compulsory module that assessed self-reported psychiatric history, clinical depression using the Composite Interview Diagnostic Interview Short Form and experiences of using commonly prescribed antidepressants. Further voluntary modules assessed a wide range of traits of relevance to psychopathology. Participants who reported they were willing to provide a DNA sample (75%) were sent a saliva kit in the mail.
FINDINGS TO DATE NlmCategory: UNASSIGNED
Depression is the most common psychiatric disorder and the largest contributor to global disability. The Australian Genetics of Depression study was established to recruit a large cohort of individuals who have been diagnosed with depression at some point in their lifetime. The purpose of establishing this cohort is to investigate genetic and environmental risk factors for depression and response to commonly prescribed antidepressants. A total of 20 689 participants were recruited through the Australian Department of Human Services and a media campaign, 75% of whom were female. The average age of participants was 43 years±15 years. Participants completed an online questionnaire that consisted of a compulsory module that assessed self-reported psychiatric history, clinical depression using the Composite Interview Diagnostic Interview Short Form and experiences of using commonly prescribed antidepressants. Further voluntary modules assessed a wide range of traits of relevance to psychopathology. Participants who reported they were willing to provide a DNA sample (75%) were sent a saliva kit in the mail. 95% of participants reported being given a diagnosis of depression by a medical practitioner and 88% met the criteria for a lifetime depressive episode. 68% of the sample report having been diagnosed with another psychiatric disorder in addition to depression. In line with findings from clinical trials, only 33% of the sample report responding well to the first antidepressant they were prescribed.
FUTURE PLANS NlmCategory: UNASSIGNED
Depression is the most common psychiatric disorder and the largest contributor to global disability. The Australian Genetics of Depression study was established to recruit a large cohort of individuals who have been diagnosed with depression at some point in their lifetime. The purpose of establishing this cohort is to investigate genetic and environmental risk factors for depression and response to commonly prescribed antidepressants. A total of 20 689 participants were recruited through the Australian Department of Human Services and a media campaign, 75% of whom were female. The average age of participants was 43 years±15 years. Participants completed an online questionnaire that consisted of a compulsory module that assessed self-reported psychiatric history, clinical depression using the Composite Interview Diagnostic Interview Short Form and experiences of using commonly prescribed antidepressants. Further voluntary modules assessed a wide range of traits of relevance to psychopathology. Participants who reported they were willing to provide a DNA sample (75%) were sent a saliva kit in the mail. 95% of participants reported being given a diagnosis of depression by a medical practitioner and 88% met the criteria for a lifetime depressive episode. 68% of the sample report having been diagnosed with another psychiatric disorder in addition to depression. In line with findings from clinical trials, only 33% of the sample report responding well to the first antidepressant they were prescribed. A number of analyses to investigate the genetic architecture of depression and common comorbidities will be conducted. The cohort will contribute to the global effort to identify genetic variants that increase risk to depression. Furthermore, a thorough investigation of genetic and psychosocial predictors of antidepressant response and side effects is planned.
Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2020. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.
DATE PUBLISHED
2020 May 26
HISTORY
PUBSTATUS PUBSTATUSDATE
entrez 2020/05/29 06:00
pubmed 2020/05/29 06:00
medline 2020/05/29 06:00
AUTHORS
NAME COLLECTIVENAME LASTNAME FORENAME INITIALS AFFILIATION AFFILIATIONINFO
Byrne EM Byrne Enda M EM Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia enda.byrne@uq.edu.au.
Kirk KM Kirk Katherine M KM QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston, Queensland, Australia.
Medland SE Medland Sarah E SE QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston, Queensland, Australia.
McGrath JJ McGrath John J JJ National Center for Register-based Research, University of Aarhus, Aarhus, Denmark.
Colodro-Conde L Colodro-Conde Lucia L QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston, Queensland, Australia.
Parker R Parker Richard R QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston, Queensland, Australia.
Cross S Cross Simone S QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston, Queensland, Australia.
Sullivan L Sullivan Lenore L QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston, Queensland, Australia.
Statham DJ Statham Dixie J DJ School of Health and Life Sciences, Federation University, Ballarat, Victoria, Australia.
Levinson DF Levinson Douglas F DF Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA.
Licinio J Licinio Julio J College of Medicine, State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY, United States.
Wray NR Wray Naomi R NR Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
Hickie IB Hickie Ian B IB Brain and Mind Centre, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
Martin NG Martin Nicholas G NG QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston, Queensland, Australia.
INVESTIGATORS
JOURNAL
VOLUME: 10
ISSUE: 5
TITLE: BMJ open
ISOABBREVIATION: BMJ Open
YEAR: 2020
MONTH: May
DAY: 26
MEDLINEDATE:
SEASON:
CITEDMEDIUM: Internet
ISSN: 2044-6055
ISSNTYPE: Electronic
MEDLINE JOURNAL
MEDLINETA: BMJ Open
COUNTRY: England
ISSNLINKING: 2044-6055
NLMUNIQUEID: 101552874
PUBLICATION TYPE
PUBLICATIONTYPE TEXT
Journal Article
COMMENTS AND CORRECTIONS
GRANTS
GENERAL NOTE
KEYWORDS
KEYWORD
anxiety disorders
depression & mood disorders
genetics
MESH HEADINGS
SUPPLEMENTARY MESH
GENE SYMBOLS
CHEMICALS
OTHER ID's