Genetic Epidemiology, Translational Neurogenomics, Psychiatric Genetics and Statistical Genetics Laboratories investigate the pattern of disease in families, particularly identical and non-identical twins, to assess the relative importance of genes and environment in a variety of important health problems.
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PMID
32126298
TITLE
Educational attainment polygenic scores are associated with cortical total surface area and regions important for language and memory.
ABSTRACT
It is well established that higher cognitive ability is associated with larger brain size. However, individual variation in intelligence exists despite brain size and recent studies have shown that a simple unifactorial view of the neurobiology underpinning cognitive ability is probably unrealistic. Educational attainment (EA) is often used as a proxy for cognitive ability since it is easily measured, resulting in large sample sizes and, consequently, sufficient statistical power to detect small associations. This study investigates the association between three global (total surface area (TSA), intra-cranial volume (ICV) and average cortical thickness) and 34 regional cortical measures with educational attainment using a polygenic scoring (PGS) approach. Analyses were conducted on two independent target samples of young twin adults with neuroimaging data, from Australia (N ​= ​1097) and the USA (N ​= ​723), and found that higher EA-PGS were significantly associated with larger global brain size measures, ICV and TSA (R  ​= ​0.006 and 0.016 respectively, p ​< ​0.001) but not average thickness. At the regional level, we identified seven cortical regions-in the frontal and temporal lobes-that showed variation in surface area and average cortical thickness over-and-above the global effect. These regions have been robustly implicated in language, memory, visual recognition and cognitive processing. Additionally, we demonstrate that these identified brain regions partly mediate the association between EA-PGS and cognitive test performance. Altogether, these findings advance our understanding of the neurobiology that underpins educational attainment and cognitive ability, providing focus points for future research.
Copyright © 2020 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
DATE PUBLISHED
2020 May 15
HISTORY
PUBSTATUS PUBSTATUSDATE
received 2019/07/17
revised 2020/02/06
accepted 2020/02/26
pubmed 2020/03/04 06:00
medline 2020/03/04 06:00
entrez 2020/03/04 06:00
AUTHORS
NAME COLLECTIVENAME LASTNAME FORENAME INITIALS AFFILIATION AFFILIATIONINFO
Mitchell BL Mitchell Brittany L BL Department of Genetics & Computational Biology, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, QLD, Australia; School of Biomedical Sciences, Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. Electronic address: Brittany.mitchell@qimrberghofer.edu.au.
Cuéllar-Partida G Cuéllar-Partida Gabriel G The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.
Grasby KL Grasby Katrina L KL Department of Genetics & Computational Biology, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.
Campos AI Campos Adrian I AI Department of Genetics & Computational Biology, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, QLD, Australia; Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.
Strike LT Strike Lachlan T LT Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.
Hwang LD Hwang Liang-Dar LD The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.
Okbay A Okbay Aysu A Department of Economics, School of Business and Economics, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
Thompson PM Thompson Paul M PM Imaging Genetics Center, Mark & Mary Stevens Institute for Neuroimaging & Informatics, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
Medland SE Medland Sarah E SE Department of Genetics & Computational Biology, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.
Martin NG Martin Nicholas G NG Department of Genetics & Computational Biology, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, QLD, Australia; School of Biomedical Sciences, Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.
Wright MJ Wright Margaret J MJ Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia; Centre for Advanced Imaging, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.
Rentería ME Rentería Miguel E ME Department of Genetics & Computational Biology, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, QLD, Australia; School of Biomedical Sciences, Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.
INVESTIGATORS
JOURNAL
VOLUME: 212
ISSUE:
TITLE: NeuroImage
ISOABBREVIATION: Neuroimage
YEAR: 2020
MONTH: May
DAY: 15
MEDLINEDATE:
SEASON:
CITEDMEDIUM: Internet
ISSN: 1095-9572
ISSNTYPE: Electronic
MEDLINE JOURNAL
MEDLINETA: Neuroimage
COUNTRY: United States
ISSNLINKING: 1053-8119
NLMUNIQUEID: 9215515
PUBLICATION TYPE
PUBLICATIONTYPE TEXT
Journal Article
COMMENTS AND CORRECTIONS
GRANTS
GENERAL NOTE
KEYWORDS
KEYWORD
Brain structure
Broca’s area
Educational attainment
Intelligence
Polygenic scores
MESH HEADINGS
SUPPLEMENTARY MESH
GENE SYMBOLS
CHEMICALS
OTHER ID's