Genetic Epidemiology, Translational Neurogenomics, Psychiatric Genetics and Statistical Genetics Laboratories investigate the pattern of disease in families, particularly identical and non-identical twins, to assess the relative importance of genes and environment in a variety of important health problems.
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PMID
31922575
TITLE
Changes in thyroid function across adolescence: a longitudinal study.
ABSTRACT
OBJECTIVE NlmCategory: OBJECTIVE
There are no large, longitudinal studies of thyroid function across adolescence. The aims of this study were to examine longitudinal trends in TSH, fT3 and fT4 and determine age-specific reference ranges.
METHODS NlmCategory: METHODS
There are no large, longitudinal studies of thyroid function across adolescence. The aims of this study were to examine longitudinal trends in TSH, fT3 and fT4 and determine age-specific reference ranges. Thyroid function was assessed in 3415 participants in the Brisbane Longitudinal Twin Study at age 12, 14 and 16, using the Abbott ARCHITECT immunoassay. Longitudinal analyses were adjusted for body mass index and puberty.
RESULTS NlmCategory: RESULTS
There are no large, longitudinal studies of thyroid function across adolescence. The aims of this study were to examine longitudinal trends in TSH, fT3 and fT4 and determine age-specific reference ranges. Thyroid function was assessed in 3415 participants in the Brisbane Longitudinal Twin Study at age 12, 14 and 16, using the Abbott ARCHITECT immunoassay. Longitudinal analyses were adjusted for body mass index and puberty. In girls, mean fT4 (± SE) increased between age 12 and 14 (by 0.30 ± 0.08 pmol/L, P <0.001), while remaining unchanged in boys; from age 14 to 16, fT4 increased in both girls (by 0.42 ± 0.07 pmol/L, P <0.001) and boys (0.64 ± 0.07 pmol/L, P <0.001). Free T3 increased slightly from 12 to 14 years in girls (by 0.07 ± 0.03 pmol/L; P = 0.042) with a more marked increase in boys (0.29 ± 0.03 pmol/L, P < 0.001) then decreased from age 14 to 16 in both sexes (girls, by 0.53 ± 0.02 pmol/L, P <0.001; boys, by 0.62 ± 0.03 pmol/L, P <0.001). From age 12 to 14, TSH showed no significant change in girls or boys, then increased from age 14 to 16 in both sexes (girls, by 4.9%, 95% CI 2.4 to 10.3%, P = 0.020; boys, by 7.2%, 95% CI 3.0 to 11.6%, P=0.001). Reference ranges differed substantially from adults, particularly for fT4 and fT3.
CONCLUSIONS NlmCategory: CONCLUSIONS
There are no large, longitudinal studies of thyroid function across adolescence. The aims of this study were to examine longitudinal trends in TSH, fT3 and fT4 and determine age-specific reference ranges. Thyroid function was assessed in 3415 participants in the Brisbane Longitudinal Twin Study at age 12, 14 and 16, using the Abbott ARCHITECT immunoassay. Longitudinal analyses were adjusted for body mass index and puberty. In girls, mean fT4 (± SE) increased between age 12 and 14 (by 0.30 ± 0.08 pmol/L, P <0.001), while remaining unchanged in boys; from age 14 to 16, fT4 increased in both girls (by 0.42 ± 0.07 pmol/L, P <0.001) and boys (0.64 ± 0.07 pmol/L, P <0.001). Free T3 increased slightly from 12 to 14 years in girls (by 0.07 ± 0.03 pmol/L; P = 0.042) with a more marked increase in boys (0.29 ± 0.03 pmol/L, P < 0.001) then decreased from age 14 to 16 in both sexes (girls, by 0.53 ± 0.02 pmol/L, P <0.001; boys, by 0.62 ± 0.03 pmol/L, P <0.001). From age 12 to 14, TSH showed no significant change in girls or boys, then increased from age 14 to 16 in both sexes (girls, by 4.9%, 95% CI 2.4 to 10.3%, P = 0.020; boys, by 7.2%, 95% CI 3.0 to 11.6%, P=0.001). Reference ranges differed substantially from adults, particularly for fT4 and fT3. Thyroid function tests in adolescents display complex, sexually dimorphic patterns. Implementation of adolescence-specific reference ranges may be appropriate.
Endocrine Society 2020. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
DATE PUBLISHED
2020 Jan 10
HISTORY
PUBSTATUS PUBSTATUSDATE
received 2019/10/16
entrez 2020/01/11 06:00
pubmed 2020/01/11 06:00
medline 2020/01/11 06:00
AUTHORS
NAME COLLECTIVENAME LASTNAME FORENAME INITIALS AFFILIATION AFFILIATIONINFO
Campbell PJ Campbell Purdey J PJ Department of Endocrinology & Diabetes, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, WA, Australia.
Brown SJ Brown Suzanne J SJ Department of Endocrinology & Diabetes, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, WA, Australia.
Kendrew P Kendrew Phillip P Pathwest Laboratory Medicine, Nedlands, WA, Australia.
Lewer M Lewer Michelle M Pathwest Laboratory Medicine, Nedlands, WA, Australia.
Lim EM Lim Ee Mun EM Pathwest Laboratory Medicine, Nedlands, WA, Australia.
Joseph J Joseph John J Pathwest Laboratory Medicine, Nedlands, WA, Australia.
Cross SM Cross Simone M SM QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.
Wright MJ Wright Margaret J MJ Centre for Advanced Imaging, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.
Martin NG Martin Nicholas G NG QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.
Wilson SG Wilson Scott G SG Department of Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, King's College London, London, UK.
Walsh JP Walsh John P JP Medical School, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, Australia.
INVESTIGATORS
JOURNAL
VOLUME:
ISSUE:
TITLE: The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism
ISOABBREVIATION: J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab.
YEAR: 2020
MONTH: Jan
DAY: 10
MEDLINEDATE:
SEASON:
CITEDMEDIUM: Internet
ISSN: 1945-7197
ISSNTYPE: Electronic
MEDLINE JOURNAL
MEDLINETA: J Clin Endocrinol Metab
COUNTRY: United States
ISSNLINKING: 0021-972X
NLMUNIQUEID: 0375362
PUBLICATION TYPE
PUBLICATIONTYPE TEXT
Journal Article
COMMENTS AND CORRECTIONS
GRANTS
GENERAL NOTE
KEYWORDS
KEYWORD
Adolescents
Reference ranges
TSH
Thyroid hormones
fT3
fT4
MESH HEADINGS
SUPPLEMENTARY MESH
GENE SYMBOLS
CHEMICALS
OTHER ID's