Genetic Epidemiology, Translational Neurogenomics, Psychiatric Genetics and Statistical Genetics Laboratories investigate the pattern of disease in families, particularly identical and non-identical twins, to assess the relative importance of genes and environment in a variety of important health problems.
QIMR Home Page
GenEpi Home Page
Publications
Contacts
Research
Staff Index
Collaborators
Software Tools
Computing Resources
Studies
Search
GenEpi Intranet
PMID
31406173
TITLE
Metabolomics reveals a link between homocysteine and lipid metabolism and leukocyte telomere length: the ENGAGE consortium.
ABSTRACT
Telomere shortening has been associated with multiple age-related diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and dementia. However, the biological mechanisms responsible for these associations remain largely unknown. In order to gain insight into the metabolic processes driving the association of leukocyte telomere length (LTL) with age-related diseases, we investigated the association between LTL and serum metabolite levels in 7,853 individuals from seven independent cohorts. LTL was determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and the levels of 131 serum metabolites were measured with mass spectrometry in biological samples from the same blood draw. With partial correlation analysis, we identified six metabolites that were significantly associated with LTL after adjustment for multiple testing: lysophosphatidylcholine acyl C17:0 (lysoPC a C17:0, p-value = 7.1 × 10 ), methionine (p-value = 9.2 × 10 ), tyrosine (p-value = 2.1 × 10 ), phosphatidylcholine diacyl C32:1 (PC aa C32:1, p-value = 2.4 × 10 ), hydroxypropionylcarnitine (C3-OH, p-value = 2.6 × 10 ), and phosphatidylcholine acyl-alkyl C38:4 (PC ae C38:4, p-value = 9.0 × 10 ). Pathway analysis showed that the three phosphatidylcholines and methionine are involved in homocysteine metabolism and we found supporting evidence for an association of lipid metabolism with LTL. In conclusion, we found longer LTL associated with higher levels of lysoPC a C17:0 and PC ae C38:4, and with lower levels of methionine, tyrosine, PC aa C32:1, and C3-OH. These metabolites have been implicated in inflammation, oxidative stress, homocysteine metabolism, and in cardiovascular disease and diabetes, two major drivers of morbidity and mortality.
DATE PUBLISHED
2019 Aug 12
HISTORY
PUBSTATUS PUBSTATUSDATE
received 2018/09/11
accepted 2019/06/26
entrez 2019/08/14 06:00
pubmed 2019/08/14 06:00
medline 2019/08/14 06:00
AUTHORS
NAME COLLECTIVENAME LASTNAME FORENAME INITIALS AFFILIATION AFFILIATIONINFO
van der Spek A van der Spek Ashley A Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
Broer L Broer Linda L Department of Internal Medicine, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
Draisma HHM Draisma Harmen H M HHM Section of Genomics of Common Disease, Imperial College London, Burlington Danes Building Room E301, Du Cane Road, London, W12 0NN, UK.
Pool R Pool René R BBMRI-NL: Infrastructure for the Application of Metabolomics Technology in Epidemiology (RP4), Utrecht, The Netherlands.
Albrecht E Albrecht Eva E Institute of Genetic Epidemiology, Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany.
Beekman M Beekman Marian M Molecular Epidemiology, Department of Biomedical Data Sciences, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.
Mangino M Mangino Massimo M NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at Guy's and St Thomas' Foundation Trust, London, SE1 9RT, UK.
Raag M Raag Mait M Institute of Family Medicine and Public Health, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.
Nyholt DR Nyholt Dale R DR School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health, Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.
Dharuri HK Dharuri Harish K HK Department of Human Genetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.
Codd V Codd Veryan V Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Leicester and NIHR Leicester Biomedical Research Centre, Glenfield Hospital, Leicester, UK.
Amin N Amin Najaf N Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
de Geus EJC de Geus Eco J C EJC Amsterdam Public Health research institute, Amsterdam University Medical Centers, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
Deelen J Deelen Joris J Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing, Cologne, Germany.
Demirkan A Demirkan Ayse A Department of Human Genetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.
Yet I Yet Idil I Department of Bioinformatics, Institute of Health Sciences, Hacettepe University, 06100, Ankara, Turkey.
Fischer K Fischer Krista K Institute of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.
Haller T Haller Toomas T Estonian Genome Center, Institute of Genomics, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.
Henders AK Henders Anjali K AK The Institute for Molecular Biosciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
Isaacs A Isaacs Aaron A CARIM School for Cardiovascular Diseases, Maastricht Centre for Systems Biology (MaCSBio), and Department of Biochemistry, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
Medland SE Medland Sarah E SE QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Australia.
Montgomery GW Montgomery Grant W GW QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Australia.
Mooijaart SP Mooijaart Simon P SP Department of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.
Strauch K Strauch Konstantin K Chair of Genetic Epidemiology, IBE, Faculty of Medicine, LMU Munich, Germany.
Suchiman HED Suchiman H Eka D HED Molecular Epidemiology, Department of Biomedical Data Sciences, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.
Vaarhorst AAM Vaarhorst Anika A M AAM Molecular Epidemiology, Department of Biomedical Data Sciences, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.
van Heemst D van Heemst Diana D Department of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.
Wang-Sattler R Wang-Sattler Rui R Research Unit of Molecular Epidemiology, Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany.
Whitfield JB Whitfield John B JB QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Australia.
Willemsen G Willemsen Gonneke G Amsterdam Public Health research institute, Amsterdam University Medical Centers, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
Wright MJ Wright Margaret J MJ Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
Martin NG Martin Nicholas G NG QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Australia.
Samani NJ Samani Nilesh J NJ Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Leicester and NIHR Leicester Biomedical Research Centre, Glenfield Hospital, Leicester, UK.
Metspalu A Metspalu Andres A Estonian Genome Center, Institute of Genomics, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.
Eline Slagboom P Eline Slagboom P P Molecular Epidemiology, Department of Biomedical Data Sciences, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.
Spector TD Spector Tim D TD Department of Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology, King's College London, London, UK.
Boomsma DI Boomsma Dorret I DI BBMRI-NL: Infrastructure for the Application of Metabolomics Technology in Epidemiology (RP4), Utrecht, The Netherlands.
van Duijn CM van Duijn Cornelia M CM Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. c.vanduijn@erasmusmc.nl.
Gieger C Gieger Christian C Institute of Genetic Epidemiology, Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany.
INVESTIGATORS
JOURNAL
VOLUME: 9
ISSUE: 1
TITLE: Scientific reports
ISOABBREVIATION: Sci Rep
YEAR: 2019
MONTH: Aug
DAY: 12
MEDLINEDATE:
SEASON:
CITEDMEDIUM: Internet
ISSN: 2045-2322
ISSNTYPE: Electronic
MEDLINE JOURNAL
MEDLINETA: Sci Rep
COUNTRY: England
ISSNLINKING: 2045-2322
NLMUNIQUEID: 101563288
PUBLICATION TYPE
PUBLICATIONTYPE TEXT
Journal Article
COMMENTS AND CORRECTIONS
GRANTS
GRANTID AGENCY COUNTRY
Wellcome Trust United Kingdom
619667 Department of Health | National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC)
GENERAL NOTE
KEYWORDS
MESH HEADINGS
SUPPLEMENTARY MESH
GENE SYMBOLS
CHEMICALS
OTHER ID's