Genetic Epidemiology, Translational Neurogenomics, Psychiatric Genetics and Statistical Genetics Laboratories investigate the pattern of disease in families, particularly identical and non-identical twins, to assess the relative importance of genes and environment in a variety of important health problems.
QIMR Home Page
GenEpi Home Page
Publications
Contacts
Research
Staff Index
Collaborators
Software Tools
Computing Resources
Studies
Search
GenEpi Intranet
PMID
31005972
TITLE
New insight into human sweet taste: a genome-wide association study of the perception and intake of sweet substances.
ABSTRACT
BACKGROUND NlmCategory: BACKGROUND
Individual differences in human perception of sweetness are partly due to genetics; however, which genes are associated with the perception and the consumption of sweet substances remains unclear.
OBJECTIVE NlmCategory: OBJECTIVE
Individual differences in human perception of sweetness are partly due to genetics; however, which genes are associated with the perception and the consumption of sweet substances remains unclear. The aim of this study was to verify previous reported associations within genes involved in the peripheral receptor systems (i.e., TAS1R2, TAS1R3, and GNAT3) and reveal novel loci.
METHODS NlmCategory: METHODS
Individual differences in human perception of sweetness are partly due to genetics; however, which genes are associated with the perception and the consumption of sweet substances remains unclear. The aim of this study was to verify previous reported associations within genes involved in the peripheral receptor systems (i.e., TAS1R2, TAS1R3, and GNAT3) and reveal novel loci. We performed genome-wide association scans (GWASs) of the perceived intensity of 2 sugars (glucose and fructose) and 2 high-potency sweeteners (neohesperidin dihydrochalcone and aspartame) in an Australian adolescent twin sample (n = 1757), and the perceived intensity and sweetness and the liking of sucrose in a US adult twin sample (n = 686). We further performed GWASs of the intake of total sugars (i.e., total grams of all dietary mono- and disaccharides per day) and sweets (i.e., handfuls of candies per day) in the UK Biobank sample (n = ≤174,424 white-British individuals). All participants from the 3 independent samples were of European ancestry.
RESULTS NlmCategory: RESULTS
Individual differences in human perception of sweetness are partly due to genetics; however, which genes are associated with the perception and the consumption of sweet substances remains unclear. The aim of this study was to verify previous reported associations within genes involved in the peripheral receptor systems (i.e., TAS1R2, TAS1R3, and GNAT3) and reveal novel loci. We performed genome-wide association scans (GWASs) of the perceived intensity of 2 sugars (glucose and fructose) and 2 high-potency sweeteners (neohesperidin dihydrochalcone and aspartame) in an Australian adolescent twin sample (n = 1757), and the perceived intensity and sweetness and the liking of sucrose in a US adult twin sample (n = 686). We further performed GWASs of the intake of total sugars (i.e., total grams of all dietary mono- and disaccharides per day) and sweets (i.e., handfuls of candies per day) in the UK Biobank sample (n = ≤174,424 white-British individuals). All participants from the 3 independent samples were of European ancestry. We found a strong association between the intake of total sugars and the single nucleotide polymorphism rs11642841 within the FTO gene on chromosome 16 (P = 3.8 × 10-8) and many suggestive associations (P < 1.0 × 10-5) for each of the sweet perception and intake phenotypes. We showed genetic evidence for the involvement of the brain in both sweet taste perception and sugar intake. There was limited support for the associations with TAS1R2, TAS1R3, and GNAT3 in all 3 European samples.
CONCLUSIONS NlmCategory: CONCLUSIONS
Individual differences in human perception of sweetness are partly due to genetics; however, which genes are associated with the perception and the consumption of sweet substances remains unclear. The aim of this study was to verify previous reported associations within genes involved in the peripheral receptor systems (i.e., TAS1R2, TAS1R3, and GNAT3) and reveal novel loci. We performed genome-wide association scans (GWASs) of the perceived intensity of 2 sugars (glucose and fructose) and 2 high-potency sweeteners (neohesperidin dihydrochalcone and aspartame) in an Australian adolescent twin sample (n = 1757), and the perceived intensity and sweetness and the liking of sucrose in a US adult twin sample (n = 686). We further performed GWASs of the intake of total sugars (i.e., total grams of all dietary mono- and disaccharides per day) and sweets (i.e., handfuls of candies per day) in the UK Biobank sample (n = ≤174,424 white-British individuals). All participants from the 3 independent samples were of European ancestry. We found a strong association between the intake of total sugars and the single nucleotide polymorphism rs11642841 within the FTO gene on chromosome 16 (P = 3.8 × 10-8) and many suggestive associations (P < 1.0 × 10-5) for each of the sweet perception and intake phenotypes. We showed genetic evidence for the involvement of the brain in both sweet taste perception and sugar intake. There was limited support for the associations with TAS1R2, TAS1R3, and GNAT3 in all 3 European samples. Our findings indicate that genes additional to those involved in the peripheral receptor system are also associated with the sweet taste perception and intake of sweet-tasting foods. The functional potency of the genetic variants within TAS1R2, TAS1R3, and GNAT3 may be different between ethnic groups and this warrants further investigations.
Copyright American Society for Nutrition 2019.
DATE PUBLISHED
2019 Apr 21
HISTORY
PUBSTATUS PUBSTATUSDATE
received 2018/10/31
accepted 2019/03/01
entrez 2019/04/22 06:00
pubmed 2019/04/22 06:00
medline 2019/04/22 06:00
AUTHORS
NAME COLLECTIVENAME LASTNAME FORENAME INITIALS AFFILIATION AFFILIATIONINFO
Hwang LD Hwang Liang-Dar LD Faculty of Medicine.
Lin C Lin Cailu C Monell Chemical Senses Center, Philadelphia, PA.
Gharahkhani P Gharahkhani Puya P QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
Cuellar-Partida G Cuellar-Partida Gabriel G Faculty of Medicine.
Ong JS Ong Jue-Sheng JS Faculty of Medicine.
An J An Jiyuan J QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
Gordon SD Gordon Scott D SD QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
Zhu G Zhu Gu G QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
MacGregor S MacGregor Stuart S QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
Lawlor DA Lawlor Deborah A DA Population Health Science, Bristol Medical School, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
Breslin PAS Breslin Paul A S PAS Department of Nutritional Sciences, School of Environmental and Biological Sciences, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ.
Wright MJ Wright Margaret J MJ Centre for Advanced Imaging, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
Martin NG Martin Nicholas G NG QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
Reed DR Reed Danielle R DR Monell Chemical Senses Center, Philadelphia, PA.
INVESTIGATORS
JOURNAL
VOLUME:
ISSUE:
TITLE: The American journal of clinical nutrition
ISOABBREVIATION: Am. J. Clin. Nutr.
YEAR: 2019
MONTH: Apr
DAY: 21
MEDLINEDATE:
SEASON:
CITEDMEDIUM: Internet
ISSN: 1938-3207
ISSNTYPE: Electronic
MEDLINE JOURNAL
MEDLINETA: Am J Clin Nutr
COUNTRY: United States
ISSNLINKING: 0002-9165
NLMUNIQUEID: 0376027
PUBLICATION TYPE
PUBLICATIONTYPE TEXT
Journal Article
COMMENTS AND CORRECTIONS
GRANTS
GENERAL NOTE
KEYWORDS
KEYWORD
FTO
BMI
genome-wide association scan
perception
preference
sugar intake
sweet taste
taste receptor
MESH HEADINGS
SUPPLEMENTARY MESH
GENE SYMBOLS
CHEMICALS
OTHER ID's