Genetic Epidemiology, Psychiatric Genetics, Asthma Genetics and Statistical Genetics Laboratories investigate the pattern of disease in families, particularly identical and non-identical twins, to assess the relative importance of genes and environment in a variety of important health problems.
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PMID
29354681
TITLE
Lingual Gyrus Surface Area Is Associated with Anxiety-Depression Severity in Young Adults: A Genetic Clustering Approach.
ABSTRACT
Here we aimed to identify cortical endophenotypes for anxiety-depression. Our data-driven approach used vertex-wise genetic correlations (estimated from a twin sample: 157 monozygotic and 194 dizygotic twin pairs) to parcellate cortical thickness (CT) and surface area (SA) into genetically homogeneous regions (Chen et al., 2013). In an overlapping twin and sibling sample (n = 834; aged 15-29, 66% female), in those with anxiety-depression Somatic and Psychological Health Report (SPHERE) scores (Hickie et al., 2001) above median, we found a reduction of SA in an occipito-temporal cluster, which comprised part of the right lingual, fusiform and parahippocampal gyrii. A similar reduction was observed in the Human Connectome Project (HCP) sample (n = 890, age 22-37, 56.5% female) in those with Adult Self Report (ASR) DSM-oriented scores (Achenbach et al., 2005) in the 25-95% quantiles. A post hoc vertex-wise analysis identified the right lingual and, to a lesser extent the fusiform gyrus. Overall, the surface reduction explained by the anxiety-depression scores was modest (r = -0.10, 3rd order spline, and r = -0.040, 1st order spline in the HCP). The discordant results in the top 5% of the anxiety-depression scores may be explained by differences in recruitment between the studies. However, we could not conclude whether this cortical region was an endophenotype for anxiety-depression as the genetic correlations did not reach significance, which we attribute to the modest effect size (post hoc statistical power <10%).
DATE PUBLISHED
2018 Jan-Feb
HISTORY
PUBSTATUS PUBSTATUSDATE
received 2017/05/08
revised 2017/12/21
accepted 2017/12/25
entrez 2018/01/23 06:00
pubmed 2018/01/23 06:00
medline 2018/01/23 06:00
AUTHORS
NAME COLLECTIVENAME LASTNAME FORENAME INITIALS AFFILIATION AFFILIATIONINFO
Couvy-Duchesne B Couvy-Duchesne Baptiste B Centre for Advanced Imaging, University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072, Australia.
Strike LT Strike Lachlan T LT Queensland Brain Institute, University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072, Australia.
de Zubicaray GI de Zubicaray Greig I GI Institute of Health Biomedical Innovations, Queensland Institute of Technology, Brisbane 4006, Australia.
McMahon KL McMahon Katie L KL Centre for Advanced Imaging, University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072, Australia.
Thompson PM Thompson Paul M PM Imaging Genetics Center, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Marina del Rey, CA 90292.
Hickie IB Hickie Ian B IB Brain and Mind Research Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney 2050, Australia.
Martin NG Martin Nicholas G NG QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane 4006, Australia.
Wright MJ Wright Margaret J MJ Centre for Advanced Imaging, University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072, Australia.
INVESTIGATORS
JOURNAL
VOLUME: 5
ISSUE: 1
TITLE: eNeuro
ISOABBREVIATION: eNeuro
YEAR:
MONTH:
DAY:
MEDLINEDATE: 2018 Jan-Feb
SEASON:
CITEDMEDIUM: Internet
ISSN: 2373-2822
ISSNTYPE: Electronic
MEDLINE JOURNAL
MEDLINETA: eNeuro
COUNTRY: United States
ISSNLINKING: 2373-2822
NLMUNIQUEID: 101647362
PUBLICATION TYPE
PUBLICATIONTYPE TEXT
Journal Article
COMMENTS AND CORRECTIONS
GRANTS
GENERAL NOTE
KEYWORDS
KEYWORD
cortical surface area
depression anxiety
endophenotype
genetic clustering
lingual gyrus
nonlinear effect
MESH HEADINGS
SUPPLEMENTARY MESH
GENE SYMBOLS
CHEMICALS
OTHER ID's