Genetic Epidemiology, Psychiatric Genetics, Asthma Genetics and Statistical Genetics Laboratories investigate the pattern of disease in families, particularly identical and non-identical twins, to assess the relative importance of genes and environment in a variety of important health problems.
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PMID
28466235
TITLE
Cannabis and Depression: A Twin Model Approach to Co-morbidity.
ABSTRACT
Cannabis use disorder (CUD) co-occurs with major depressive disorder (MDD) more frequently than would be expected by chance. However, studies to date have not produced a clear understanding of the mechanisms underlying this co-morbidity. Genetically informative studies can add valuable insight to this problem, as they allow the evaluation of competing models of co-morbidity. This study uses data from the Australian Twin Registry to compare 13 co-morbidity twin models initially proposed by Neale and Kendler (Am J Hum Genet 57:935-953, 1995). The analysis sample comprised 2410 male and female monozygotic and dizygotic twins (average age 32) who were assessed on CUD and MDD using the SSAGA-OZ interview. Data were analyzed in OpenMx. Of the 13 different co-morbidity models, two fit equally well: CUD causes MDD and Random Multiformity of CUD. Both fit substantially better than the Correlated Liabilities model. Although the current study cannot differentiate between them statistically, these models, in combination, suggest that CUD risk factors may causally influence the risk to develop MDD, but only when risk for CUD is high.
DATE PUBLISHED
2017 May 02
HISTORY
PUBSTATUS PUBSTATUSDATE
received 2016/11/23
accepted 2017/04/13
entrez 2017/05/04 06:00
pubmed 2017/05/04 06:00
medline 2017/05/04 06:00
AUTHORS
NAME COLLECTIVENAME LASTNAME FORENAME INITIALS AFFILIATION AFFILIATIONINFO
Smolkina M Smolkina M M National Addiction Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology, and Neuroscience, King's College London, Addiction Sciences Building, 4 Windsor Walk, SE5 8BB, London, UK. milana.smolkina@kcl.ac.uk.
Morley KI Morley K I KI Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
Rijsdijk F Rijsdijk F F Social, Genetic & Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology, and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK.
Agrawal A Agrawal A A Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA.
Bergin JE Bergin J E JE Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA.
Nelson EC Nelson E C EC Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA.
Statham D Statham D D Faculty of Arts, Business and Law, School of Social Sciences, University of the Sunshine Coast, Sippy Downs, QLD, Australia.
Martin NG Martin N G NG Genetic Epidemiology, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.
Lynskey MT Lynskey M T MT National Addiction Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology, and Neuroscience, King's College London, Addiction Sciences Building, 4 Windsor Walk, SE5 8BB, London, UK.
INVESTIGATORS
JOURNAL
VOLUME:
ISSUE:
TITLE: Behavior genetics
ISOABBREVIATION: Behav. Genet.
YEAR: 2017
MONTH: May
DAY: 02
MEDLINEDATE:
SEASON:
CITEDMEDIUM: Internet
ISSN: 1573-3297
ISSNTYPE: Electronic
MEDLINE JOURNAL
MEDLINETA: Behav Genet
COUNTRY: United States
ISSNLINKING: 0001-8244
NLMUNIQUEID: 0251711
PUBLICATION TYPE
PUBLICATIONTYPE TEXT
Journal Article
COMMENTS AND CORRECTIONS
GRANTS
GENERAL NOTE
KEYWORDS
KEYWORD
Cannabis use disorder
Co-morbidity
Genetics
Major depressive disorder
Twin model
MESH HEADINGS
SUPPLEMENTARY MESH
GENE SYMBOLS
CHEMICALS
OTHER ID's