Genetic Epidemiology, Psychiatric Genetics, Asthma Genetics and Statistical Genetics Laboratories investigate the pattern of disease in families, particularly identical and non-identical twins, to assess the relative importance of genes and environment in a variety of important health problems.
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PMID
25754080
TITLE
Common polygenic risk for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is associated with cognitive ability in the general population.
ABSTRACT
NlmCategory: UNASSIGNED
Cognitive impairment is common among individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). It has been suggested that some aspects of intelligence are preserved or even superior in people with ASD compared with controls, but consistent evidence is lacking. Few studies have examined the genetic overlap between cognitive ability and ASD/ADHD. The aim of this study was to examine the polygenic overlap between ASD/ADHD and cognitive ability in individuals from the general population. Polygenic risk for ADHD and ASD was calculated from genome-wide association studies of ASD and ADHD conducted by the Psychiatric Genetics Consortium. Risk scores were created in three independent cohorts: Generation Scotland Scottish Family Health Study (GS:SFHS) (n=9863), the Lothian Birth Cohorts 1936 and 1921 (n=1522), and the Brisbane Adolescent Twin Sample (BATS) (n=921). We report that polygenic risk for ASD is positively correlated with general cognitive ability (beta=0.07, P=6 × 10(-7), r(2)=0.003), logical memory and verbal intelligence in GS:SFHS. This was replicated in BATS as a positive association with full-scale intelligent quotient (IQ) (beta=0.07, P=0.03, r(2)=0.005). We did not find consistent evidence that polygenic risk for ADHD was associated with cognitive function; however, a negative correlation with IQ at age 11 years (beta=-0.08, Z=-3.3, P=0.001) was observed in the Lothian Birth Cohorts. These findings are in individuals from the general population, suggesting that the relationship between genetic risk for ASD and intelligence is partly independent of clinical state. These data suggest that common genetic variation relevant for ASD influences general cognitive ability.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 10 March 2015; doi:10.1038/mp.2015.12.
DATE PUBLISHED
2015 Mar 10
HISTORY
PUBSTATUS PUBSTATUSDATE
received 2014/04/23
revised 2014/11/25
accepted 2014/12/19
entrez 2015/03/11 06:00
pubmed 2015/03/11 06:00
medline 2015/03/11 06:00
AUTHORS
NAME COLLECTIVENAME LASTNAME FORENAME INITIALS AFFILIATION AFFILIATIONINFO
Clarke TK
Lupton MK
Fernandez-Pujals AM
Starr J
Davies G
Cox S
Pattie A
Liewald DC
Hall LS
MacIntyre DJ
Smith BH
Hocking LJ
Padmanabhan S
Thomson PA
Hayward C
Hansell NK
Montgomery GW
Medland SE
Martin NG
Wright MJ
Porteous DJ
Deary IJ
McIntosh AM
INVESTIGATORS
JOURNAL
VOLUME:
ISSUE:
TITLE: Molecular psychiatry
ISOABBREVIATION: Mol. Psychiatry
YEAR: 2015
MONTH: Mar
DAY: 10
MEDLINEDATE:
SEASON:
CITEDMEDIUM: Internet
ISSN: 1476-5578
ISSNTYPE: Electronic
MEDLINE JOURNAL
MEDLINETA: Mol Psychiatry
COUNTRY: England
ISSNLINKING: 1359-4184
NLMUNIQUEID: 9607835
PUBLICATION TYPE
PUBLICATIONTYPE TEXT
JOURNAL ARTICLE
COMMENTS AND CORRECTIONS
GRANTS
GRANTID AGENCY COUNTRY
104036 Wellcome Trust United Kingdom
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