Genetic Epidemiology, Psychiatric Genetics, Asthma Genetics and Statistical Genetics Laboratories investigate the pattern of disease in families, particularly identical and non-identical twins, to assess the relative importance of genes and environment in a variety of important health problems.
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PMID
24358107
TITLE
Dog behavior co-varies with height, bodyweight and skull shape.
ABSTRACT
Dogs offer unique opportunities to study correlations between morphology and behavior because skull shapes and body shape are so diverse among breeds. Several studies have shown relationships between canine cephalic index (CI: the ratio of skull width to skull length) and neural architecture. Data on the CI of adult, show-quality dogs (six males and six females) were sourced in Australia along with existing data on the breeds' height, bodyweight and related to data on 36 behavioral traits of companion dogs (n = 8,301) of various common breeds (n = 49) collected internationally using the Canine Behavioral Assessment and Research Questionnaire (C-BARQ). Stepwise backward elimination regressions revealed that, across the breeds, 33 behavioral traits all but one of which are undesirable in companion animals correlated with either height alone (n = 14), bodyweight alone (n = 5), CI alone (n = 3), bodyweight-and-skull shape combined (n = 2), height-and-skull shape combined (n = 3) or height-and-bodyweight combined (n = 6). For example, breed average height showed strongly significant inverse relationships (p<0.001) with mounting persons or objects, touch sensitivity, urination when left alone, dog-directed fear, separation-related problems, non-social fear, defecation when left alone, owner-directed aggression, begging for food, urine marking and attachment/attention-seeking, while bodyweight showed strongly significant inverse relationships (p<0.001) with excitability and being reported as hyperactive. Apart from trainability, all regression coefficients with height were negative indicating that, across the breeds, behavior becomes more problematic as height decreases. Allogrooming increased strongly (p<0.001) with CI and inversely with height. CI alone showed a strong significant positive relationship with self-grooming (p<0.001) but a negative relationship with chasing (p = 0.020). The current study demonstrates how aspects of CI (and therefore brain shape), bodyweight and height co-vary with behavior. The biological basis for, and significance of, these associations remain to be determined.
DATE PUBLISHED
2013
HISTORY
PUBSTATUS PUBSTATUSDATE
ecollection 2013
received 2013/06/24
accepted 2013/10/14
epublish 2013/12/16
entrez 2013/12/21 06:00
pubmed 2013/12/21 06:00
medline 2014/10/01 06:00
AUTHORS
NAME COLLECTIVENAME LASTNAME FORENAME INITIALS AFFILIATION AFFILIATIONINFO
McGreevy PD McGreevy Paul D PD Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
Georgevsky D Georgevsky Dana D Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
Carrasco J Carrasco Johanna J Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
Valenzuela M Valenzuela Michael M Brain and Mind Research Institute, Faculty of Medicine, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
Duffy DL Duffy Deborah L DL School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States of America.
Serpell JA Serpell James A JA School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States of America.
INVESTIGATORS
JOURNAL
VOLUME: 8
ISSUE: 12
TITLE: PloS one
ISOABBREVIATION: PLoS ONE
YEAR: 2013
MONTH:
DAY:
MEDLINEDATE:
SEASON:
CITEDMEDIUM: Internet
ISSN: 1932-6203
ISSNTYPE: Electronic
MEDLINE JOURNAL
MEDLINETA: PLoS One
COUNTRY: United States
ISSNLINKING: 1932-6203
NLMUNIQUEID: 101285081
PUBLICATION TYPE
PUBLICATIONTYPE TEXT
Journal Article
COMMENTS AND CORRECTIONS
REFTYPE REFSOURCE REFPMID NOTE
Cites J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2003 Nov 1;223(9):1293-300 14621216
Cites Brain Behav Evol. 2004;63(1):13-22 14673195
Cites J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2004 Sep 15;225(6):861-7 15485044
Cites PLoS One. 2012;7(7):e41684 22844513
Cites Science. 2009 Aug 21;325(5943):995-8 19608863
Cites PLoS One. 2010;5(7):e11946 20668685
Cites Genome Res. 2011 Aug;21(8):1294-305 21566151
Cites Aust Vet J. 2008 Jan-Feb;86(1-2):18-25 18271818
GRANTS
GENERAL NOTE
KEYWORDS
MESH HEADINGS
DESCRIPTORNAME QUALIFIERNAME
Aggression physiology
Animals physiology
Behavior, Animal physiology
Body Weight physiology
Cephalometry physiology
Dogs physiology
Fear physiology
Female physiology
Male physiology
Questionnaires physiology
Skull anatomy & histology
SUPPLEMENTARY MESH
GENE SYMBOLS
CHEMICALS
OTHER ID's
OTHERID SOURCE
PMC3864788 NLM