Genetic Epidemiology, Translational Neurogenomics, Psychiatric Genetics and Statistical Genetics Laboratories investigate the pattern of disease in families, particularly identical and non-identical twins, to assess the relative importance of genes and environment in a variety of important health problems.
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PMID
16354499
TITLE
Limitations of DSM-IV operationalizations of alcohol abuse and dependence in a sample of Australian twins.
ABSTRACT
Alcohol abuse and dependence are among the most common psychiatric conditions identified in epidemiological surveys of the general population. The aim of this article is to examine the psychometric properties of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, (4th ed.; DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) criteria for alcohol abuse and dependence using latent class analysis (LCA). Six thousand two hundred and sixty-five young Australian twins (median age 30 years) were interviewed by telephone between 1996 and 2000 using a modified version of the Semi-Structured Assessment for the Genetics of Alcoholism (SSAGA). DSM-IV symptoms of alcohol abuse and dependence were collected by structured diagnostic interview and analyzed using methods of LCA. LCA revealed a 4-class solution for women that classified individuals according to the severity of their alcohol-related problems: no/few problems (66.5%), heavy drinking (23.9%), moderate dependence (7.6%) and severe dependence (2.0%). Among men the preferred solution included 5 classes corresponding to no/few problems (46.4%), heavy drinking (34.3%), moderate dependence (12.2%), severe dependence (3.0%) and abuse (4.0%). Evidence of a male-specific class of alcohol-related problems corresponding to abuse partially supports the DSM conceptualization of alcohol use disorders but suggests that this conceptualization--and measurement--may need to be refined for women. Identification of a male-specific abuse class also has important implications for interventions and treatment as these individuals experienced significant alcohol-related problems and comprised approximately 21% of all men classified with an alcohol use disorder.
DATE PUBLISHED
2005 Dec
HISTORY
PUBSTATUS PUBSTATUSDATE
pubmed 2005/12/16 09:00
medline 2006/03/15 09:00
entrez 2005/12/16 09:00
AUTHORS
NAME COLLECTIVENAME LASTNAME FORENAME INITIALS AFFILIATION AFFILIATIONINFO
Lynskey MT Lynskey Michael T MT Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. Mlynskey@matlock.wustl.edu
Nelson EC Nelson Elliot C EC
Neuman RJ Neuman Rosalind J RJ
Bucholz KK Bucholz Kathleen K KK
Madden PA Madden Pamela A F PA
Knopik VS Knopik Valerie S VS
Slutske W Slutske Wendy W
Whitfield JB Whitfield John B JB
Martin NG Martin Nicholas G NG
Heath AC Heath Andrew C AC
INVESTIGATORS
JOURNAL
VOLUME: 8
ISSUE: 6
TITLE: Twin research and human genetics : the official journal of the International Society for Twin Studies
ISOABBREVIATION: Twin Res Hum Genet
YEAR: 2005
MONTH: Dec
DAY:
MEDLINEDATE:
SEASON:
CITEDMEDIUM: Print
ISSN: 1832-4274
ISSNTYPE: Print
MEDLINE JOURNAL
MEDLINETA: Twin Res Hum Genet
COUNTRY: England
ISSNLINKING: 1832-4274
NLMUNIQUEID: 101244624
PUBLICATION TYPE
PUBLICATIONTYPE TEXT
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Twin Study
COMMENTS AND CORRECTIONS
GRANTS
GRANTID AGENCY COUNTRY
AA07728 NIAAA NIH HHS United States
AA10248 NIAAA NIH HHS United States
AA11998 NIAAA NIH HHS United States
AA13321 NIAAA NIH HHS United States
GENERAL NOTE
KEYWORDS
MESH HEADINGS
DESCRIPTORNAME QUALIFIERNAME
Adult
Age Factors
Alcoholic Intoxication epidemiology
Alcoholism epidemiology
Australia epidemiology
Female epidemiology
Humans epidemiology
Interviews as Topic epidemiology
Longitudinal Studies epidemiology
Male epidemiology
Retrospective Studies epidemiology
Sex Factors epidemiology
SUPPLEMENTARY MESH
GENE SYMBOLS
CHEMICALS
OTHER ID's