Genetic Epidemiology, Translational Neurogenomics, Psychiatric Genetics and Statistical Genetics Laboratories investigate the pattern of disease in families, particularly identical and non-identical twins, to assess the relative importance of genes and environment in a variety of important health problems.
QIMR Home Page
GenEpi Home Page
Publications
Contacts
Research
Staff Index
Collaborators
Software Tools
Computing Resources
Studies
Search
GenEpi Intranet
PMID
15724882
TITLE
Genetic effects on alcohol dependence risk: re-evaluating the importance of psychiatric and other heritable risk factors.
ABSTRACT
BACKGROUND NlmCategory: BACKGROUND
Genetic influences have been shown to play a major role in determining the risk of alcohol dependence (AD) in both women and men; however, little attention has been directed to identifying the major sources of genetic variation in AD risk.
METHOD NlmCategory: METHODS
Diagnostic telephone interview data from young adult Australian twin pairs born between 1964 and 1971 were analyzed. Cox regression models were fitted to interview data from a total of 2708 complete twin pairs (690 MZ female, 485 MZ male, 500 DZ female, 384 DZ male, and 649 DZ female/male pairs). Structural equation models were fitted to determine the extent of residual genetic and environmental influences on AD risk while controlling for effects of sociodemographic and psychiatric predictors on risk.
RESULTS NlmCategory: RESULTS
Risk of AD was increased in males, in Roman Catholics, in those reporting a history of major depression, social anxiety problems, and conduct disorder, or (in females only) a history of suicide attempt and childhood sexual abuse; but was decreased in those reporting Baptist, Methodist, or Orthodox religion, in those who reported weekly church attendance, and in university-educated males. After allowing for the effects of sociodemographic and psychiatric predictors, 47 % (95% CI 28-55) of the residual variance in alcoholism risk was attributable to additive genetic effects, 0% (95% CI 0-14) to shared environmental factors, and 53% (95% CI 45-63) to nonshared environmental influences.
CONCLUSIONS NlmCategory: CONCLUSIONS
Controlling for other risk factors, substantial residual heritability of AD was observed, suggesting that psychiatric and other risk factors play a minor role in the inheritance of AD.
DATE PUBLISHED
2004 Nov
HISTORY
PUBSTATUS PUBSTATUSDATE
pubmed 2005/02/24 09:00
medline 2005/04/20 09:00
entrez 2005/02/24 09:00
AUTHORS
NAME COLLECTIVENAME LASTNAME FORENAME INITIALS AFFILIATION AFFILIATIONINFO
Knopik VS Knopik Valerie S VS Missouri Alcoholism Research Center, Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63108, USA. vsknopik@matlock.wustl.edu
Heath AC Heath Andrew C AC
Madden PA Madden Pamela A F PA
Bucholz KK Bucholz Kathleen K KK
Slutske WS Slutske Wendy S WS
Nelson EC Nelson Elliot C EC
Statham D Statham Dixie D
Whitfield JB Whitfield John B JB
Martin NG Martin Nicholas G NG
INVESTIGATORS
JOURNAL
VOLUME: 34
ISSUE: 8
TITLE: Psychological medicine
ISOABBREVIATION: Psychol Med
YEAR: 2004
MONTH: Nov
DAY:
MEDLINEDATE:
SEASON:
CITEDMEDIUM: Print
ISSN: 0033-2917
ISSNTYPE: Print
MEDLINE JOURNAL
MEDLINETA: Psychol Med
COUNTRY: England
ISSNLINKING: 0033-2917
NLMUNIQUEID: 1254142
PUBLICATION TYPE
PUBLICATIONTYPE TEXT
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Twin Study
COMMENTS AND CORRECTIONS
GRANTS
GRANTID AGENCY COUNTRY
AA0758O NIAAA NIH HHS United States
AA10249 NIAAA NIH HHS United States
AA11998 NIAAA NIH HHS United States
AA13321 NIAAA NIH HHS United States
DA12854 NIDA NIH HHS United States
GENERAL NOTE
KEYWORDS
MESH HEADINGS
DESCRIPTORNAME QUALIFIERNAME
Adult
Alcoholism psychology
Anxiety Disorders complications
Australia complications
Child complications
Child Abuse, Sexual complications
Depression complications
Female complications
Humans complications
Male complications
Mental Disorders genetics
Regression Analysis genetics
Risk Factors genetics
Suicide, Attempted genetics
SUPPLEMENTARY MESH
GENE SYMBOLS
CHEMICALS
OTHER ID's